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Original Research Article

Decreased Theta Event-Related Synchronization during Working Memory Activation Is Associated with Progressive Mild Cognitive Impairment

Missonnier P.a · Gold G.c · Herrmann F.R.c · Fazio-Costa L.b · Michel J.-P.c · Deiber M.-P.a · Michon A.b · Giannakopoulos P.b, d

Author affiliations

aNeuroimaging Unit, bDivision of Geriatric Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University Hospitals of Geneva, cDepartment of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, Geneva, and dDivision of Old Age Psychiatry, University Hospitals of Lausanne, Prilly, Switzerland

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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2006;22:250–259

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Received: June 03, 2006
Published online: August 30, 2006
Issue release date: August 2006

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

Background: Among the different quantitative electroencephalographic markers, theta activity is known to reflect neural resources involved in memory processes and directed attention. Previous studies suggested that synchronization likelihood analysis in theta-band frequency might be a sensitive method to identify early alterations of neuronal networks in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: We report here a longitudinal study of 24 MCI patients with theta event-related synchronization (ERS) analysis during the n-back working memory task and neuropsychological follow-up after 1 year. Statistical analysis included analysis of variance and logistic regression to assess the relationship between cognitive decline and theta ERS. Results: Upon follow-up, 13 MCI patients showed progressive MCI and 11 remained stable. In both groups, the phasic increase in theta amplitude after stimulus presentation did not depend on working memory load and electrode sites. Progressive MCI cases displayed significantly lower theta ERS power over all electrode sites compared to stable MCI cases. Theta ERS was significantly related to the cognitive outcome explaining 15.5% of its variability. In terms of MCI classification, the best combination of sensitivity and specificity was 0.87 and 0.60, respectively, with an area under the corresponding receiver operating characteristic curve reaching 76%. Conclusions: The present data indicate that a decrease in the early phasic theta ERS power during working memory activation may predict cognitive decline in MCI. This phenomenon is not related to working memory load but may reflect the presence of early deficits in directed attention-related neural circuits in MCI.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Received: June 03, 2006
Published online: August 30, 2006
Issue release date: August 2006

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM


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