Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Research Article

Improvement of Episodic Memory in Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Older Adults: Evidence from a Cognitive Intervention Program

Belleville S.a, b · Gilbert B.a · Fontaine F.a · Gagnon L.c · Ménard E.b · Gauthier S.d

Author affiliations

aInstitut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, bCentre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cognition, Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, cResearch Center, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, and dAlzheimer and Related Disorders Clinic of the McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, Verdun, Canada

Related Articles for ""

Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2006;22:486–499

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information












By signing up for MyKarger you will automatically participate in our year-End raffle.
If you Then Do Not wish To participate, please uncheck the following box.

Yes, I wish To participate In the year-End raffle And Get the chance To win some Of our most interesting books, And other attractive prizes.


I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information












By signing up for MyKarger you will automatically participate in our year-End raffle.
If you Then Do Not wish To participate, please uncheck the following box.

Yes, I wish To participate In the year-End raffle And Get the chance To win some Of our most interesting books, And other attractive prizes.


I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Received: February 09, 2006
Published online: November 03, 2006
Issue release date: November 2006

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

The efficacy of cognitive training was assessed in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and persons with normal cognitive aging. Forty-seven participants were included in this study: 28 with MCI and 17 controls. Twenty-one participants received intervention (20 MCI and 9 controls) and 16 participants (8 MCI and 8 controls) received no intervention (waiting-list group). The intervention focused on teaching episodic memory strategies. Three tasks of episodic memory (list recall, face-name association, text memory) were used as primary outcome measures. Results were analyzed using analyses of variance. The intervention effect (pre- and post-intervention difference) was significant on two of the primary outcome measures (delayed list recall and face-name association). A significant pre-post-effect was also found on measures of subjective memory and well-being. There was no improvement in the performance of groups of individuals with MCI and normal elderly persons who did not receive the intervention. These results suggest that persons with MCI can improve their performance on episodic memory when provided with cognitive training.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Petersen RC Doody R, Kurz A, Mohs RC, Morris JC, Rabins PV, Ritchie K, Rossor M, Thal L, Winblad B: Current concepts in MCI. Arch Neurol 2001;58:1985–1992.
  2. Petersen RC, Smith GE, Waring SC, Ivnik RJ, Tangalos EG, Kokmen E: Mild cognitive impairment: clinical characterization and outcome. Arch Neurol 1999;56:303–308.
  3. Gauthier S: Pharmacotherapy of mild cognitive impairment. Dialogues Clin Neurosci 2004;6:391–395.
  4. Lyketsos CG, Lopez O, Jones B, Fitzpatrih AL, Breitenr J, DeKosky S: Prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Results from the cardiovascular health study. JAMA 2002;288:1475–1483.
  5. Bellezza FS: Mnemonic devices: classification, characteristics, and criteria. Rev Educ Res 1981;512:247–275.
    External Resources
  6. Yesavage JA, Rose TL: Concentration and mnemonic training in elderly subjects with memory complaints: a study of combined therapy and order effects. Psychiatry Res 1983;9:157–167.
  7. Stigsdotter A, Bäckman L: Multifactorial memory training with older adults: how to foster maintenance of improved performance. Gerontology 1989;35:260–267.
  8. Yesavage JA, Sheikh JI, Friedman L, Tanke E: Learning mnemonics: roles of aging and subtle cognitive impairment. Psychol Aging 1990;51:133–137.
    External Resources
  9. Stigsdotter A, Bäckman L: Long-term maintenance of gains from memory training in older adults: two 3 1/2-year follow-up studies. J Gerontol Psychol Sci 1993;485:233–237.
  10. Stigsdotter A, Bäckman L: Maintenance of gains following multifactorial and unifactorial memory training in late adulthood. Educ Gerontol 1993;19:105–117.
    External Resources
  11. Stigsdotter A, Bäckman L: Effects of multifactorial memory training in old age: generalizability across tasks and individuals. J Gerontol Psychol Sci 1995;50b3:134–140.
  12. Ball H, Berch DB, Helmers KF, Jobe JB, Leveck MD, Marsike M, Morris J, Rebok GW, Smith DM, Tennstedt SL, Unverzagt FW, Willis SL, for the ACTIVE group: Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2002;288:2271–2281.
  13. Yesavage JA: Nonpharmacologic treatments for memory losses with normal aging. Am J Psychiatry 1985;1425:600–604.
  14. Greenberg C, Powers SM: Memory improvement among adult learners. Educ Gerontol 1987;13:263–280.
    External Resources
  15. Willis SL: Cognitive training and everyday competence. Ann Rev Gerontol Geriatr 1987;7:160–188.
  16. Verhaeghen P, Marcoen A, Goossens L: Improving memory performance in the aged through mnemonic training: a meta-analytic study. Psychol Aging 1992;72:242–251.
    External Resources
  17. Floyd M, Scogin F: Effects of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults: a meta-analysis. Psychol Aging 1997;12:150–161.
  18. Gunther VK, Schafer P, Holzner BJ, Kemmler GW: Long-term improvements in cognitive performance through computer-assisted cognitive training: a pilot study in a residential home for older people. Aging Ment Health 2003;7:200–206.
  19. Rapp D, Brenes G, Marsh AP: Memory enhancement training for older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a preliminary study. Aging Ment Health 2002;6:5–11.
  20. Olazaran J, Muniz R, Reisberg B, Pena-Casanova J, del Ser T, Cruz-Jentoft AJ, Serrano P, Navarro E, Garcia de la Rocha ML, Frank A, Galiano M, Fernandez-Bullido Y, Serra JA, Gonzales-Salvador MT, Sevilla C: Benefits of cognitive-motor intervention in MCI and mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. Neurology 2004;63:2348–2353.
  21. Petersen RC, Smith GE, Waring SC, Ivnik RJ, Kokmen E, Tangelos EG: Aging, memory, and mild cognitive impairment. Int Psychogeriatr 1997;9(suppl 1):65–69.
  22. Morris JC, Storandt M, Miller PJ, McKeel DW: Mild Cognitive Impairment represents early-stage Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol 2001:58:397–405.
  23. Goldman WP, Baty JD, Buckles VD, Sahrmann S, Morris JC: Motor dysfunction in mildly demented AD individuals without extrapyramidal signs. Neurology 1999;53:956–962.
  24. Flicker C, Ferris SJ, Reisberg B: Mild cognitive impairment in the elderly: predictors of dementia. Neurology 1991;41:1006–1009.
  25. Tierney MC, Szalai JP, Snow WG, Fisher RH, Nores A, Nadon G, Dunn E, St George-Hyslop PH: Prediction of probable Alzheimer’s disease in memory-impaired patients: a prospective longitudinal study. Neurology 1996;463:661–665.
  26. Kramer AF, Larish JF, Strayer DL: Training for attentional control in dual task settings: a comparison of young and old adults. J Exp Psychol Appl 1995;11:50–76.
    External Resources
  27. Baron A, Mattila WR: Response slowing of older adults: effects of time-limit contingencies on single- and dual-task performances. Psychol Aging 1989;4:66–72.
  28. Albert MS, Jones K, Savage CR, Berkman L, Seeman T, Blazer D, Rowe JW: Predictors of cognitive change in older persons: MacArthur studies of successful aging. Psychol Aging 1995;10:578–589.
  29. Zacks RT, Hasher L, Li KZH: Human memory; in Craik FIM, Salthouse TA (eds): The Handbook of Aging and Cognition, Mahwah NJ, Erlbaum, 2000, pp 293–357.
  30. Lachman ME, Weaver SL, Bandura M, Elliott E, Lewkowicz CJ: Improving memory and control beliefs through cognitive restructuring and self-generated strategies. J Gerontol Psychol Sci 1992;475:293–299.
  31. Yesavage JA: Imagery pretraining and memory training in the elderly. Gerontology 1983;29:271–275.
  32. Reddy BG, Bellezza FS: Interference between mnemonic and categorical organization in memory. Bull Psychon Soc 1986;243:169–171.
  33. Yesavage JA, Brink TL, Rose TL, Lum O, Huang V, Adey MB, Leirer VO: Development and validation of a Geriatric Depression Rating Scale: a preliminary report. J Psychiatr Res 1983;17:37–49.
  34. Bourque P, Blanchard L, Vézina J: Étude psychométrique de l’Échelle de dépression gériatrique. Can J Aging 1990;9:348–355.
    External Resources
  35. Folstein MF, Folstein SE, McHugh PR: Mini-mental state: a practical method for grading the cognitive state of outpatients for the clinician. J Psychiatr Res 1975;12:189–198.
  36. Mattis S: Mental status examination for organic mental syndrome in the elderly patient; in Bellak R, Karasu TB (eds): Geriatric Psychiatry. New York, NY, Grune & Stratton, 1976, pp 77–121.
  37. Lucas JA, Ivnik RJ, Smith GE, Bohac DL, Tangalos EG, Kokmen E, Graff-Radford NR, Petersen RC: Normative data for the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol 1998;20:536–547.
  38. Signoret JL: Batterie d’Efficience Mnésique BEM 144. Paris, Editions Scientifiques Elsevier, 1991.
  39. Deloche G, Hannequin D: Test de dénomination orale d’images (DO-80). Paris, Centre de Psychologie Appliquée, 1997.
  40. Regard M: Cognitive rigidity and flexibility: a neuropsychological study. Unpublished PhD dissertation, University of Victoria, BC, 1981.
  41. Rey A: Test de copie d’une figure complexe: Manuel. Paris, Les Éditions du Centre de psychologie appliquée, 1959.
  42. McKhann G, Drachman D, Folstein M, Katzman R, Proce D, Stadlan EM: Clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease: report of the NINCDS-ADRDA work group under the auspices of Health and Human Services Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease. Neurology 1984;34:939–944.
  43. Flynn TM, Storandt M: Supplemental group discussions in memory training for older adults. Psychol Aging 1990;52:178–181.
    External Resources
  44. Scogin F, Prohaska M: The efficacy of self-taught memory training for community-dwelling older adults. Educ Gerontol 1992;18:751–766.
    External Resources
  45. West RL: Compensatory strategies for age-associated memory impairment; in Baddeley AD, Wilson BA, Watts FN (eds): Handbook of Memory Disorders. Chichester, Wiley, 1995, pp 481–500.
  46. Moffat N: Strategies of Memory Therapy; in Wilson B, Moffat N (eds): Clinical Management of Memory Problems. Kent, Croom Helm, 1984, pp 63–88.
  47. Wilson B: Memory therapy in practice; in Wilson B, Moffat N (eds): Clinical Management of Memory Problems. Kent, Croom Helm, 1984, pp 89–111.
  48. Zarit SH, Cole KD, Guider RL: Memory training strategies and subjective complaints of memory in the aged. Gerontologist 1981;212:158–164.
  49. Belleville S, Chatelois J, Fontaine F, Lussier I, Peretz I, Renaseau-Leclerc C: Batterie informatisée d’évaluation de la mémoire. Montréal, Côte-des-Neiges, 1992.
  50. Chatelois J, Pineau H, Belleville S, Peretz I, Lussier I, Fontaine F, Renaseau-Leclerc C: Batterie informatisée d’évaluation de la mémoire inspirée de l’approche cognitive. Can Psychol 1993;34:45–63.
    External Resources
  51. Cadilhac C, Gély-Nargeot M-C, Virbel J, Nespoulous JL: De l’essentiel aux détails: le rappel des structures narratives par des sujets âgés normaux et déments; in Lambert J, Nespoulous J-L (eds): Perception auditive et compréhension du langage. Marseille, Solal, 1997, pp 295–317.
  52. Gély-Nargeot MC, Cadilhac C, Touchon J, Nespoulous JL: La mémoire de textes chez les sujets sains et déments : application d’un nouvel outil d’évaluation pour neuro psychologues: mémo-textes; in Lambert J, Nespoulous JL (eds): Perception auditive et compréhension du langage. Marseille, Solal, 1997, pp 273–293.
  53. Van der Linden M, Wijns Ch, Von Frenkell R, Coyette F, Seron X: Un questionnaire d’auto-évaluation de la mémoire QAM [A memory auto-assessment questionnaire]. Bruxelles, Editest, 1989.
  54. Bravo G, Gaulin P, Dubois M-F: Validation d’une échelle de bien-être général auprès d’une population âgées de 50 à 75 ans. Can J Aging 1996;151:112–128.
  55. Belleville S, Peretz I, Malenfant D: Examination of the working memory components in normal aging and in dementia of the Alzheimer type. Neuropsychologia 1996;34:195–207.
  56. Bherer L, Belleville S, Peretz R: Education, age and the Brown-Peterson technique. Dev Neuropsychol2001;19:237–251.
  57. Kluger A, Ferris SH, Golomb J, Mittelman MS, Reisberg B: Neuropsychological prediction of decline to dementia in nondemented elderly. J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol 1999;124:168–179.
    External Resources
  58. Tierney MC, Szalai JP, Snow WG, Fisher RH: The prediction of Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol 1996;53:423–427.
  59. Jack CR, Petersen RC, Xu YC, O’Brien PC, Smith GE, Ivnik RJ, Boeve BF, Waring SC, Tangalos EG, Kokmen E: Prediction of AD with MRI-based hippocampal volume in mild cognitive impairment. Neurology 1999;52:1397–1403.
  60. Lambon Ralph MA, Patterson K, Graham N, Dawson K, Hodges JR: Homogeneity and heterogeneity in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of 55 cases. Brain 2003;126:2350–2362.
  61. Petersen RC. Conceptual overview; in Petersen RC (ed): Mild Cognitive Impairment: Aging to Alzheimer’s disease. Oxford, University Press, 2003, pp 1–14.
  62. Gauthier S, Touchon J: Subclassification of mild cognitive impairment in research and in clinical practice; in Gauthier S, Scheltens P, Cummings JL (eds): Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Annual 2004. London, Martin Dunitz, 2004, pp 61–69.
  63. Cohen J: Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences. 2nd Ed. Mahwah (NJ), Erlbaum, 1988.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Received: February 09, 2006
Published online: November 03, 2006
Issue release date: November 2006

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.