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Commentary

Another Nine-Inch Nail for Behavioral Genetics!

Lerner R.M.

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Tufts University, Medford, Mass., USA

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Human Development 2006;49:336–342

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Article / Publication Details

Published online: January 18, 2007
Issue release date: January 2007

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0018-716X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0054 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HDE


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Abstract of <i>Commentary</i>

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Article / Publication Details

Published online: January 18, 2007
Issue release date: January 2007

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0018-716X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0054 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HDE


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