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Original Article

Facial Displays in Young Tufted Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella): Appearance, Meaning, Context and Target

De Marco A.a, b · Visalberghi E.a

Author affiliations

aIstituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Roma, e bGiardino faunistico di Piano dell’Abatino, Poggio San Lorenzo, Italia

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Folia Primatol 2007;78:118–137

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: January 16, 2006
Accepted: June 14, 2006
Published online: February 16, 2007
Issue release date: February 2007

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 10
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

Facial displays are important for communication, and their ontogeny has been studied primarily in chimpanzees and macaques. We investigated the ontogeny, communicative function and target of facial displays in Cebus apella. Our results show that facial displays are absent at birth and develop as infants grow older. Lip-smacking appears first (at about 1 month of age), followed by scalp-lifting, relaxed open-mouth, silent bared-teeth, open-mouth silent bared-teeth displays and finally the open-mouth threat face. Infants perform most facial displays in the same contexts as adults, with the exception of the silent bared-teeth display that young capuchins use primarily, or exclusively, in affiliative contexts. Interestingly, facial displays are exchanged very often with peers, less frequently with adults and almost never with the mother.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: January 16, 2006
Accepted: June 14, 2006
Published online: February 16, 2007
Issue release date: February 2007

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 10
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


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