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Review

A Keratinocyte’s Course of Life

Houben E. · De Paepe K. · Rogiers V.

Author affiliations

Department of Toxicology, Dermato-cosmetology and Pharmacognosy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

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Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol 2007;20:141–147

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Received: June 15, 2006
Accepted: October 05, 2006
Published online: December 21, 2006
Issue release date: May 2007

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP

Abstract

An adequate permeability barrier function of the mammalian epidermis is guaranteed by the characteristic architecture of the stratum corneum. This uppermost layer consists of a highly organized extracellular lipid compartment which is tightly joined to the corneocytes. The generation of the extracellular lipid compartment and the transformation of the keratinocytes into corneocytes are the main features of epidermal differentiation. However, equally important is the continuous renewal of the stratum corneum, which is insured by a careful balance between the replenishment of new keratinocytes from the proliferating basal layer, and the well-orchestrated loss of the most superficial cells after the so-called ‘epidermal programmed cell death’. In this overview, the complete life of keratinocytes is described, from the proliferative organization to the process of desquamation.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Received: June 15, 2006
Accepted: October 05, 2006
Published online: December 21, 2006
Issue release date: May 2007

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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