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Original Article

Class I genes have split from the MHC in the tammar wallaby

Deakin J.E.a · Siddle H.V.b · Cross J.G.R.a · Belov K.b · Graves J.A.M.a

Author affiliations

aARC Centre for Kangaroo Genomics, Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, and bCentre for Advanced Technologies in Animal Genetics and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 116:205–211 (2007)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Published online: February 23, 2007
Issue release date: February 2007

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Genes within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are critical to the immune response and immunoregulation. Comparative studies have revealed that the MHC has undergone many changes throughout evolution yet in tetrapods the three different classes of MHC genes have maintained linkage, suggesting that there may be some functional advantage obtained by maintaining this clustering of MHC genes. Here we present data showing that class II and III genes, the antigen processing gene TAP2, and MHC framework genes are found together in the tammar wallaby on chromosome 2. Surprisingly class I loci were not found on chromosome 2 but were mapped to ten different locations spread across six chromosomes. This distribution of class I loci in the wallaby on nearly all autosomes is not a characteristic of all marsupials and may be a relatively recent phenomenon. It highlights the need for the inclusion of more than one marsupial species in comparative studies and raises questions regarding the functional significance of the clustering of MHC genes.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Published online: February 23, 2007
Issue release date: February 2007

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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