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Original Paper

Rice: Another Potential Cause of Food Allergy in Patients Sensitized to Lipid Transfer Protein

Asero R.a · Amato S.b · Alfieri B.c · Folloni S.c · Mistrello G.b

Author affiliations

aAmbulatorio di Allergologia, Clinica San Carlo, Paderno Dugnano, bLofarma SpA, Milan, and cDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Parma, Parma, Italy

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Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2007;143:69–74

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 22, 2006
Accepted: September 12, 2006
Published online: December 28, 2006
Issue release date: April 2007

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA

Abstract

Recent studies show that the lipid transfer protein (LTP), the major Rosaceae allergen in patients not sensitized to birch pollen, is a largely cross-reacting allergen. Moreover, it is a potentially hazardous allergen due to its stability upon thermal treatment and pepsin digestion. The present study reports 3 cases of rice-induced anaphylaxis in LTP-allergic patients. In vitro inhibition studies, carried out using LTP purified from both rice and apple as well as whole peach extract, show that LTP was the relevant allergen in these patients and demonstrate the cross-reactivity between rice LTP and peach/apple LTP.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 22, 2006
Accepted: September 12, 2006
Published online: December 28, 2006
Issue release date: April 2007

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA


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