Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Free Access

Diverticular Disease in the Elderly

Comparato G.a · Pilotto A.b · Franzè A.c · Franceschi M.a, b · Di Mario F.a

Author affiliations

aChair of Gastroenterology, University of Parma, Parma, bDepartment of Geriatrics, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, San Giovanni Rotondo, and cGastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera, Parma, Italy

Corresponding Author

Prof. Francesco Di Mario

Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche, Sezione di Gastroenterologia

Università degli Studi di Parma

Via Gramsci 14, IT–43100 Parma (Italy)

Tel. +39 0521 702 772, Fax +39 0521 291 582, E-Mail francesco.dimario@unipr.it

Related Articles for ""

Dig Dis 2007;25:151–159

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Abstract

There are few diseases whose incidence varies as greatly worldwide as that of diverticulosis. Its prevalence is largely age-dependent: the disease is uncommon in those under the age of 40, the prevalence of which is estimated at approximately 5%; this increases to 65% in those ≧65 years of age. Of patients with diverticula, 80–85% remain asymptomatic, while, for unknown reasons, only three-fourths of the remaining 15–20% of patients develop symptomatic diverticular disease. Traditional concepts regarding the causes of colonic diverticula include alterations in colonic wall resistance, disordered colonic motility and dietary fiber deficiency. Currently, inflammation has been proposed to play a role in diverticular disease. Goals of therapy in diverticular disease should include improvement of symptoms and prevention of recurrent attacks in symptomatic, uncomplicated diverticular disease, and prevention of the complications of disease such as diverticulitis. Diverticulitis is the most usual clinical complication of diverticular disease, affecting 10–25% of patients with diverticula. Most patients admitted with acute diverticulitis respond to conservative treatment, but 15–30% require surgery. Predictive factors for severe diverticulitis are sex, obesity, immunodeficiency and old age. Surgery for acute complications of diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon carries significant rates of morbidity and mortality, the latter of which occurs predominantly in cases of severe comorbidity. Postoperative mortality and morbidity are to a large extent driven by patient-related factors.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: May 04, 2007
Issue release date: April 2007

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0257-2753 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9875 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/DDI


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.