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Ann Nutr Metab 1996;40:243–251
(DOI:10.1159/000177964)

Consumption of Eggs with Meals Increases the Susceptibility of Human Plasma and Low-Density Lipoprotein to Lipid Peroxidation

Levy Y. · Maor I. · Presser D. · Aviram M.

Author affiliations

Lipid Research Laboratory, Rambam Medical Center, The Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, and the Rappaport Family Institute for Research in the Medical Sciences, Haifa, Israel

Corresponding Author

M. Aviram, Lipid Research Laboratory, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

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Abstract

Consumption of eggs for a long period was shown to result in hypercholesterolemia and is generally restricted for this reason. In the present study we analyzed the effect of eggs consumption for 3 weeks on lipoprotein atherogenicity. Consumption of 2 eggs per day with the meals, for 3 weeks resulted in a minor elevation in plasma glucose and urea concentrations. Plasma cholesterol concentration increased by 11 % (p < 0.05) as a result of increased plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. Plasma triglycerides decreased by 13% (p < 0.01), but there were no significant alterations in plasma apolipoproteins A-I or B-100 concentrations. Plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol decreased by 11 % (p < 0.05). There was a 13% reduction, though not significant, in the cholesterol efflux from J-774 A.l macrophages by HDL that was derived after eggs consumption in comparison to HDL that was obtained at baseline. The susceptibility of plasma [using 100 mMof 2,2’ azobis 2-amidinopropane (AAPH)] as well as that of LDL (using 10 µM of copper ions) to lipid peroxidation was increased by 42% and 34%, respectively, as measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay (p < 0.01). Kinetic analysis of LDL oxidation by copper ions revealed a 37% reduction in the lag time required for the initiation of LDL oxidation after 3 weeks of eggs consumption. The total plasma fatty acids concentration increased from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 3.2 ± 0.6 mg/ml. The plasma antioxidants, vitamin E and carotenoids were not significantly affected by eggs consumption. We conclude that eggs consumption, in addition to its hypercholesterolemic effect, increases plasma and LDL oxidizability, a phenomenon which was shown to enhance the progression of atherosclerosis. These atherogenic properties may contribute to the accelerated atherosclerosis prevalent in populations with high cholesterol intake.

© 1996 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: October 05, 1995
Accepted: May 17, 1996
Published online: November 20, 2008

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/ANM


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