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Hum Hered 1999;49:154–158
(DOI:10.1159/000022864)

The LWb Blood Group as a Marker of Prehistoric Baltic Migrations and Admixture

Sistonen P.a · Virtaranta-Knowles K.a · Denisova R.b · Kučinskas V.c · Ambrasiene D.c · Beckman L.d

Author affiliations

aFinnish Red Cross Transfusion Service, Helsinki, Finland, bInstitute of History of Latvia, Riga, Latvia, cCenter of Human Genetics, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania, and dDepartment of Medical Genetics, Umeå, Sweden

Corresponding Author

Prof. Lars Beckman

Department of Medical Genetics

Umeå University

S–901 85 Umeå (Sweden)

Tel. +46 90 785 1769, Fax +46 90 785 3593

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Abstract

Archaeological findings and historical records indicate frequent migrations and exchange of genetic material between populations in the Baltic Sea area. However, there have so far been very few attempts to trace migrations in this area using genetic markers. We have studied the Baltic populations with respect to exceptional variations in the frequencies of the Landsteiner-Wiener (LW) blood group. The frequency of the uncommon LWb gene was high in the Balts, around 6% among Latvians and Lithuanians, very low among the other western Europeans (0–0.1%) and apparently absent in Asiatic and African populations. From the Baltic region of peak frequency there was a regular decline of LWb incidence (a descending cline) in the neighboring populations: 4.0% in the Estonians, 2.9% in the Finns, 2.2% in the Vologda Russians, and 2.0% in the Poles. Thus the distribution of LWb suggests considerable and extensive Baltic admixture, especially in the north and northeast direction. In Southern Sweden with an LWb frequency of 0.3%, the Baltic influence appeared slight, while in the population of the Swedish island Gotland in the middle of the Baltic Sea there was a significantly incrased LWb frequency of 1.0% compared with that of Western European countries. The distinction of codominantly inherited LW antigenic forms, LWa and LWb (previously Nea), is known to be due to a single base substitution. Based on our population data, it is plausible that the expansion of this point mutation occurred only once during human history. Furthermore, our data indicate that the expansion of the LWb mutation occurred in Balts and that LWb can be considered a ‘Baltic tribal marker’, its presence in other populations being an indicator of the degree of Baltic genetic influence.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: May 31, 1999

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0001-5652 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0062 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/HHE


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