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Bile Acids and the Gut Liver Axis

Farnesoid X Receptor an Emerging Target to Combat Obesity

De Magalhaes Filho C.D. · Downes M. · Evans R.M.

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Gene Expression Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, Calif., USA

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Dig Dis 2017;35:185-190

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Bile Acids and the Gut Liver Axis

Published online: March 01, 2017
Issue release date: March 2017

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0257-2753 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9875 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DDI

Abstract

Obesity and its associated diseases, including type 2 diabetes, have reached epidemic levels worldwide. However, available treatment options are limited and ineffective in managing the disease. There is therefore an urgent need for the development of new pharmacological solutions. The bile acid (BA) Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has recently emerged as an attractive candidate. Initially described for their role in lipid and vitamin absorption from diet, BAs are hormones with powerful effects on whole body lipid and glucose metabolism. In this review, we focus on FXR and how 2 decades of work on this receptor, both in rodents and humans, have led to the development of drug agonists with potential use in humans for treatment of conditions ranging from obesity-associated diseases to BA dysregulation.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Bile Acids and the Gut Liver Axis

Published online: March 01, 2017
Issue release date: March 2017

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0257-2753 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9875 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DDI


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