Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Cerebrovascular Diseases

Cerebrovascular Diseases News and Features


Special Cover Illustrations 2014

Cerebrovascular Diseases 37/1/2014

Vol. 37, No. 1, 2014

“The first figure of the seventh book illustrates the human head prepared as if freed for dissectors from the neck and lower maxilla, making it ready to display the brain. We have also used a saw to make a circular cut and removed as much of the skull as is taken off to view everything that is contained in the skull cavity.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1226

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 37/2/2014

Vol. 37, No. 2, 2014

“The present [second] figure […] shows the third sinus [s. sagittalis superior] of the hard membrane […] opened by a long incision made lengthwise in the head. At the sides of this third sinus, also lengthwise in the head, I have made two incisions, one on each side by the sinus, which have penetrated the hard membrane [dura mater] only and separated the sides of the membrane from the part of the membrane [falx cerebri] that separates the right part of the brain from the left […]. […] Here, therefore, the thin cerebral membrane is completely undamaged and closely covers the brain, nicely showing the array of its vessels in the region so far laid bare.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1229

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 37/3/2014

Vol. 37, No. 3, 2014

“In the present [third] figure we have pulled away both cerebral membranes, the thin and the hard, from the entire part of the brain standing above the circular cut that we made in the skull with a saw, and separated from the bony septum [crista galli] between the sinuses [lamina, foramina cribrosa] of the organs of smell the portion of the hard membrane that divides the right part of the brain from the left […]. To bring the image of this part into view, we have left it folded out over the left side of the brain and pushed the right and left sides of the brain apart from each other with our hands so that the top of the corpus callosum presents itself elegantly to view.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1230

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 37/4/2014

Vol. 37, No. 4, 2014

“[…] Next in the order of dissection, we removed left and right portions of the brain in such a way that the ventricles of the brain now begin to come into view. First, we made a long cut along the right side of the corpus callosum […]. This incision through the right ventricle [v. lateralis] of the brain removed the portion of the right side of the brain that was above the place where we cut around the skull with a saw. When we performed the same operation on the left side, we laid down the left part of the brain by the left side in such a way that it would show the upper side of the left ventricle on one side while still keeping the corpus callosum in the head.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1232

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 37/5/2014

Vol. 37, No. 5, 2014

“The present figure is no different so far as concerns the part of the brain still in the skull. Its only peculiarity is that here we have freed the corpus callosum from the brain at its front, and then lifted it and folded it back, pulling apart the septum between the right and left ventricles and revealing the upper surface of the body [fornix] constructed like a tortoise shell.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1235

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 37/6/14

Vol. 37, No. 6, 2014

“This figure resembles the fourth so far as concerns the portion of the brain remaining in the skull, and it differs from the fifth because we have freed the body [fornix] constructed like a tortoise shell from the brain at its front and folded it upward to the rear so that its lower surface would be visible and the vessel [vena magna cerebri] that originates from the fourth sinus [s. rectus] of the hard membrane [dura mater] and is borne beneath the body constructed like a tortoise shell would also be seen. This vessel makes up a considerable part of the networks [plexus choroidei] that the ancients compared in appearance to afterbirths. ”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1236

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 38/1/14

Vol. 38, No. 1, 2014

“The present figure is considerably different from the three immediately preceding. The portion of the brain substance remaining in those figures that made up the area of the right and left ventricles is seen removed in this figure. Everything that was still resting on the cerebellum is also removed here, so that the portion of the hard membrane [dura mater cranialis, tentorium cerebelli] separating the cerebellum and the cerebrum could be seen. In addition, we have opened here the sinuses of the hard membrane [sinus durae matris] located therein […]. We have folded back the vessel [vena magna cerebri] that runs from the fourth sinus [s. rectus] of the hard membrane into the brain ventricles; here it is raised out of the third ventricle of the brain and pulled away from the networks that resemble an afterbirth [plexus choroidei] so that the area of the third ventricle or hollow common to the right and left ventricles could be more visible along with the passages of this cavity.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1238

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 38/2/14

Vol. 38, No. 2, 2014

“The eighth figure differs from the seventh in that here we have resected still more of the brain and divided the testes [tectum mesencephali, lamina tecti] with a lengthwise cut so that the passage leading from the third ventricle into the fourth would be visible. Also, the portion of the hard membrane covering the cerebellum has been cut apart here and is seen folded back to the rear.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1241

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 38/3/14

Vol. 38, No. 3, 2014

“In this figure, the same portion of the brain is shown as in the eighth. But the present figure has been placed entirely on its face, and it has the part of the hard membrane [dura mater cranialis, tentorium cerebelli] that separates the cerebrum from the cerebellum cut away. The cerebellum has been pulled down here by hand out of its seat in the skull, and hangs down slightly inverse so that the area normally in contact with the skull is presented to view and the cavity of the dorsal medulla [medulla oblongata] , which constitutes half of the fourth ventricle, is seen. In addition to the courses of various veins and nerves, the first [sinus transversus dexter] and second [sinus transversus sinister] sinuses of the hard membrane are open and precisely illustrated.”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1242

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 38/4/14

Vol. 38, No. 4, 2014

“‘In this figure, the head is shown from the left side, with the right somewhat elevated. Here we have removed the cerebellum from the skull cavity and left only the portion of the brain that was still kept in the eighth and ninth figures. But that portion of the brain is not in its usual place: it has been elevated and bent back somewhat to the rear from the base of the skull, so that the processes [tractus olfactorius, bulbus olfactorius] of the brain which are not unlike nerves and serve the organ of smell may finally come into view. The left of these has been elevated out of place with the brain itself, while the right one is still attached to the hard cerebral membrane where it covers the eighth bone of the head.’”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1246

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 38/5/14

Vol. 38, No. 5, 2014

“‘This figure rests entirely on the occiput; all the cerebral substance that still remained has been bent downward and hangs to the rear, so that the organs of smell, the meeting of the optic nerves, and the largest branches of the sleep artery [a. carotis interna] would be visible.’”
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1249

 
 
Cerebrovascular Diseases 38/6/14

Vol. 38, No. 6, 2014

“‘The head lies reclined here on its left [right] ear and shows the base of the inner space of the skull wrapped in the hard cerebral membrane. Only as much of the cerebrum and dorsal medulla still remains as suffices to show the cerebral nerve pairs. I have resected the origin and joining of the visory nerves to avoid hiding the basin that receives the cerebral phlegm.’
The Fabric of the Human Body (2014), p. 1251